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Do you have Particularly Hazardous Substances in your chemical inventory?

Particularly Hazardous Substances (PHS) are chemicals that pose a high risk to employees in the workplace. Work with these substances requires specialized training from your PI or supervisor, and customized standard operating procedures (SOPs) that identify designated work areas, containment devices (such as fume hoods and glove boxes), procedures for decontamination, and prior approvals before work begins.

 
 

Set your sights on safety: Select the correct PPE for eye hazards

PPE is the last line of defense against hazards that are part of your work in a laboratory or research space. Most eye injuries that occur in the lab are due to lack of proper personal protective equipment (PPE).

You should always evaluate your workplace for potential eye hazards so you can select the appropriate safety equipment. Eyeglasses are never a substitute for safety glasses or safety googles. There are plenty of eye protection options that fit well over your eyeglasses.

Safety glasses versus safety goggles

 
 

UW Facilities hosted the Safety Symposium

UW Facilities hosted a Safety Symposium on November 28, 2018 in the FS Training Center to engage staff on safety issues facing today's workforce. 

This was a UW Facilities-sponsored event in partnership with Environmental Health & Safety, featuring Kurt Stranne, who provided presentations on safety leadership shared by employees and employers. Lou Cariello, Vice President of UW Facilities, gave opening remarks.

 

Bats at the UW

Although bats are a key part of our ecosystem, it is important to remember that a small proportion of bats in Washington state carry rabies, a deadly disease in the saliva of infected animals.

You may have noticed bats flying around campus. They are commonly seen flying at dusk, which is normal and not a cause for concern. However, if a bat is found on the ground or indoors, it may be an indication of something wrong with the bat.

 

Many older UW buildings are made of hazardous materials

Do-it-yourself repairs or projects that disturb walls, floor tiles, ceilings, fixtures and other building materials can expose you to substances that pose serious health risks.

University policy prohibits any “do-it-yourself” construction, renovation or modification of University buildings.  Even simple projects, such as hammering a nail into a wall, can expose you to hazardous chemicals and result in regulatory fines.