Contents

Usage and Disposal Records

Short Lived Waste Form

Laboratory Contamination Survey Questions

Signage Questions

Training Questions

RAM Waste Disposal Questions

RAM Storage Questions

RAM Contamination Questions

Lab Organization

Food and Drink

Engineering Controls Questions

RAM PPE

Dosimetry Questions

Bioassay Questions

Meter Questions

Are the Radioactive Material Usage and Disposal Record (Form 160) completed and current?

Records of the use of radioactive materials must be kept. A tally of the disposition of radioactive materials should be made on the back of the Radioactive Material Usage and Disposal Record (Form 160), which accompanies any delivery of radioactive material. After the order of radioactive materials has been accounted for, the completed Form 160 must be returned to Radiation Safety for computer record entry or entered electronically into the Environmental Health and Safety Assistant (EHSA).  You should keep a copy of the Form 160 for five years after the material is completely disposed.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual, EH&S Homepage, WAC-246-221-150, and the UW Radioactive Materials License (License Number WN-C001-1).

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Are the Declaration of Decay in Storage and Final Disposition of Decay in Storage Form 176 complete and current?

Principle Investigators that hold short-lived (half-life of less than 120 days) radioactive waste for decay-in-storage are required to complete a Declaration of Decay in Storage Form 176 pt 1 and return to the UW Radiation Safety Office.  Before the radioactive waste may be disposed in regular trash the following must be completed: radioactive waste must be held for decay-in-storage for a minimum of ten half-lives; a survey of the waste box with no shielding with the appropriate meter set at its most sensitive scale must result in no measurable radiation distinguishable from background levels; all radiation labels, markings, and wording must be removed or obliterated; and the Principle Investigators must complete a Final Disposition of Decay in Storage Form 176 pt2 and submit to Radiation Safety .  For additional information please refer to the UW Radioactive Materials License (License Number WN-C001-1), EH&S Homepage, and WAC-246-221-150.

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Are laboratory contamination surveys accurate and accessible?

A contamination survey of the entire laboratory must be performed and documented each month or at the required frequency designated on the Radiation Use Authorization.  All unsealed radioactive material storage locations must now be surveyed monthly, regardless of use of the radioactive material.  The contamination surveys must be performed with instruments or wipes capable of detecting all authorized radioactive materials.  The contamination surveys must be accessible to all laboratory personnel.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual, EH&S Homepage, and WAC 246-221-110(1).

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Do laboratory contamination surveys include a map of survey locations?

A sketch of the floor plan of the work area should be used when making contamination surveys, with a number corresponding to each survey location. If wipes are used for taking contamination measurements, the wipes should be numbered with the survey location. This allows easy mapping and evaluation of contaminated areas and aids in locating the source of the contamination. An alternative to producing a sketch of the floor plan for each contamination survey is to make a detailed drawing with several numbered locations. Then, contamination survey documentation can be attached on subsequent sheets of paper. These subsequent sheets would specify the actual contamination survey locations (by number) and contamination survey results, with inferred reference back to the original drawing. Alternatively, if use EHSA to document lab contamination surveys a map of the laboratory is provided. Document lab contamination surveys in EHSA as pursuant to the Lab Radioactive Material Contamination Surveys User Guide for EHSA. For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual, EH&S Homepage, and WAC 246-221-110(1).

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Do laboratory contamination surveys include background measurements?

Results of background count must be recorded for each contamination survey.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual, EH&S Homepage, and WAC 246-221-110(1).

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Do laboratory contamination surveys include initials of surveyor?

Initials of surveyor must be recorded for each contamination survey.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual, EH&S Homepage, and WAC 246-221-110(1).

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Are laboratory contamination surveys completed with appropriate instrument/meter?

The appropriate instrument/meter required depends on the radionuclides being used.  Radiation Safety staff will advise the Principle Investigator which survey instruments are required based on the radioactive materials used.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual, EH&S Homepage, and WAC 246-221-110(1).

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Is the Notice to Employees room sign posted (one per Principle Investigator)?

The Department of Health Form RHF-3, “Notice to Employees,” is required to be posted in authorized radiation use areas. For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual.

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Is the "Caution Radioactive Materials" posted on the Certification of Authorization room sign?

The “Caution Radioactive Materials” is required to be posted on the Certification of Authorization room sign for any space in which radioactive materials are authorized to be used or stored.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual. New Certification of Authorizations can be printed from Environmental Health and Safety Assistant (EHSA).

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Is the CRAM symbol posted on the room hazard caution sign?

Laboratories authorized for radioactive materials use are required to post an up-to-date sign which includes the CRAM symbol at the entrance.  The sign is intended to alert emergency responders and visitors of potential hazards and precautions for entry.  The room hazard caution sign can be updated and printed using the caution sign button in MyChem.  For additional information please refer to the EH&S Homepage.

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Is the Exposure Response for biological, chemical, or radiological exposures room sign posted?

The Exposure Response for biological, chemical, or radiological exposures room sign is required to be posted in any space in which radioactive materials are authorized to be used or stored.  For additional information please refer to EH&S Homepage.

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Is the Spill Response room sign posted?

The Spill Response room sign is required to be posted in any space in which radioactive materials are authorized to be used or stored.  For additional information please refer to EH&S Homepage.

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Is the equipment (i.e. hoods, fridges, incubators, centrifuges, hot sink, etc.) used for radioactive materials labeled with the "Caution Radioactive Materials" equipment sign?

Appropriate radiation warning signs or labels must be used to designate radiation areas and to identify equipment used for radioactive materials. During the setup of a new laboratory, Radiation Safety staff post or provide appropriate signage, but the Principle Investigator is responsible for maintaining that posting.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual.

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Is the Quarterly Sink Disposal Record for Radioactive Materials posted by the hot sink?

The UW is allowed to dispose of material that is soluble or readily dispersible in water into the sanitary sewer, as long as quantities are restricted. A portion of the UW's allowance for sewer disposal is allocated to each lab. Each registered radioactive materials laboratory may have a sink or drain designated for liquid radioactive waste disposal.  Disposal of soluble or dispersible radioactive materials into the sink must be recorded on the Quarterly Sink Disposal Record for Radioactive Materials.  The Quarterly Sink Disposal Record for Radioactive Materials (contact Radiation Safety for this form) is required to be posted by the sink or drain designated for liquid radioactive waste disposal.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual.

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Has the Radiation Safety Training been completed and documented for all appropriate lab staff?

Individuals working directly with radioactive materials are required to complete the applicable initial radiation safety training courses before being added to a Radiation Use Authorization (RUA). Refresher radiation safety training is required annually for all individuals on an RUA. Records of this training are kept in Radiation Safety.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual and the UW Radioactive Materials License (License Number WN-C001-1).

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Has lab specific training been completed and documented?

It is required that each Principle Investigator provide instructions to all personnel on specific radiation safety concerns for the particular laboratories in which they will be working.  Instruction is required to be completed before the individual begins work with radioactive material.  The Principle Investigator is required to document and maintain records of this training.  Radiation Safety has developed a SOP Template for Working with Unsealed Radioactive Materials (contact Radiation Safety for this form) that Principle Investigators can use to meet this requirement.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual and the UW Radioactive Materials License (License Number WN-C001-1).

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Is radioactive waste stored properly (liquid waste in closed jug placed in secondary container, solid waste in radioactive waste box, appropriate shielding etc.)?

Dry waste must be stored in radioactive waste box with plastic liners and shielded appropriately.  Radiation Safety staff provides the radioactive waste box and plastic liners.  Radioactive liquid waste must be stored in tightly capped bottles or carboys within secondary containment and shielded appropriately.  For additional information please refer to the EH&S Homepage.

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Is radioactive waste labeled with contents, date, and name of generator?

It is required that all containers of radioactive waste be clearly labeled with the contents, date, and name of generator. Custodians occasionally mistakenly collect radioactive waste. A very apparent sign should be attached to each waste container to indicate radioactive waste and forestall accidental pickup by the custodial service. Use the standard radiation sign or a strip of “radioactive” labeled tape.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual, and EH&S Homepage.

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Is radioactive waste separated by short-lived and long-lived radionuclides?

Radioactive waste must be separated by short-lived (half-life of 120 days or less) radionuclides and long-lived (half-life greater than 120 days).  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual, WAC 246-221-170, and EH&S Homepage.

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Are radiation labels, markings, and wording removed and/or obliterated prior to disposal in radioactive waste box(es) (short-lived radionuclides only) and/or trash?

Radiation symbols and labels must be defaced before placing in radioactive waste box (short-lived radionuclides only).  All radionuclide labels and radiation symbols must be removed or defaced prior to disposal in regular trash.  The labels are intended as a warning. When a warning is not necessary, there is a false concern, or worse, a future disregard for the proper warning. When these empty containers appear in public areas or in normal trash, they cause unnecessary alarm.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual, EH&S Homepage, WAC 246-221-170, and the UW Radioactive Materials License (License Number WN-C001-1).

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Are liquid scintillation vials stored in vial trays and separated by half-life?

All liquid scintillation vial waste must be stored in the original cardboard trays provided by the vendor and separate by half-life. Make sure that each vial is tightly capped.  Keep the trays in secondary containment (e.g. buckets or Nalgene wash tubs, etc.).  For additional information please refer to the EH&S Homepage.

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Are Radioactive Waste Collection Requests (Online) submitted to prevent excessive accumulation of radioactive waste?

When the radioactive waste container is full a radiation waste collection pick-up must be requested electronically here.  Radioactive Waste Collection Requests are required to be submitted to prevent excessive accumulation of radioactive waste.  For additional information please refer to the EH&S Homepage.

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Is short-lived radioactive waste held for decay in storage orderly and decayed waste disposed of?

It is required that short-lived (half-life of 120 days or less) radioactive waste held for decay-in-storage is stored orderly and decayed waste is disposed of to prevent excessive accumulation of waste.  For additional information please refer to EH&S Homepage.

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Is no radioactive waste found in regular trash?

It is illegal to dispose of radioactive waste in regular trash.  Radiation Safety staff routinely surveys regular trash in laboratories authorized for radioactive material use and if radioactive waste is found this will result in the immediate suspension and possible termination of the Principle Investigators Radiation Use Authorization.  For additional information please refer to the EH&S Homepage and WAC 246-221-170.

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Are the radioactive materials stored properly?

Rooms containing radioactive material must be locked or under the control of authorized personnel such that measures can be effectively taken to prevent the unauthorized use or removal of the material.  If people not listed on the Radiation Use Authorization (RUA) are permitted to be in the room where the radioactive materials are stored, then the radioactive material must be either under constant surveillance by authorized personnel or locked such that it cannot be used or removed by an unauthorized individual.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual, the UW Radioactive Materials License (License Number WN-C001-1), EH&S Homepage, and WAC-246-221-150.

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Are the radioactive materials labeled "Caution Radioactive Materials"?

All containers of radioactive materials must be clearly labeled “Caution Radioactive Materials”. This includes containers of working solutions and stock vials.  Use the standard radiation sign or a strip of “radioactive” labeled tape.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual.

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Is the radioactive materials inventory current and correct?

The radioactive material inventory of Principle Investigators must be updated continuously.  Documentation of radioactive materials received, possessed, used, transferred, and disposed must be maintained. Therefore, Principle Investigators are responsible for tracking and accounting for radioactive material used under their authorization. Radiation Safety staff will assist the Principle Investigators in maintaining their inventory by distributing inventory verification reports at least every six months and issuing a Radioactive Material Usage and Disposal Record (Form 160) for all new radioactive material purchased under the Principle Investigators Radiation Use Authorization. It is essential that the inventory verification reports and Form 160s are returned in a timely manner or entered electronically in Environmental Health and Safety Assistant (EHSA) allowing the UW radioactive material inventory to be kept up to date.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual, the UW Radioactive Materials License (License Number WN-C001-1), EH&S Homepage, and WAC-246-221-150.

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Are the decayed radioactive materials removed from inventory and disposed of?

Decayed short-lived (half-life of 120 days or less) radioactive materials must be removed from the Principle Investigator’s inventory and disposed of.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual.

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Is contamination documented when found?

All contamination must be documented when found.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual.

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Are the Principle Investigator and Permit Contact notified of the contamination?

Radiation Safety staff must notify the Principle Investigator and Permit Contact of the contamination found.

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Is the area with contamination decontaminated to background and resurveyed, labeled for exclusive radioactive use, or disposed of as radioactive waste?

Any areas with contamination must be decontaminated to background (for removable surface radioactivity) and resurveyed, labeled for exclusive radioactive use, or disposed of as radioactive waste.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual, and EH&S Homepage.

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Is the lab adequately organized, orderly and clean to provide sufficient work space for operations involving radioactive materials without spills, accidents and other preventable incidents?

The lab must be adequately organized, orderly and clean to provide sufficient work space for operations involving radioactive materials without spills, accidents and other preventable incidents.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual.

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Is food and drink prohibited in laboratory areas authorized for radioactive material use?

Food and drink are prohibited in all laboratory areas authorized for radioactive material use.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual.

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Is shielding appropriate for work done?

Principle Investigators are required to have appropriate shielding for the radioactive materials listed on their Radiation Use Authorization.  Radiation Safety staff will advise the Principle Investigator what shielding is required based on the radioactive materials used.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual.

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Is shielding in good condition?

Principle Investigators are required to keep appropriate shielding for radioactive materials in good condition and replace shielding when necessary.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual.

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Are lead bricks not exceeding the weight limit of shelves?

Lead bricks must not exceed the weight limit of shelves.  For additional information please refer to the UW Lead Safety Manual.

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Are lead bricks stacked appropriately to prevent them from falling?

Lead bricks must be stacked appropriately to prevent them from falling.  It is required to address structural and non-structural support issues related to seismic risks with consolidated weights greater than 400 pounds or in stacks/structures greater than 5 feet in height.  For additional information please refer to the UW Lead Safety Manual.

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Are fume hoods used for radioiodinations contain the iodine fume hood insert?

All fume hoods used for radioiodinations must contain the iodine fume hood insert.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual.

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Are absorbent pads available for use?

Principle Investigators are required to keep supplies of absorbent pads in the laboratory.  Absorbent pads can be used to prevent radioactive contamination and prevent the spread of contamination in the event of a spill of radioactive material.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual.

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Are supplies of minimum PPE required for working with radioactive materials available to all authorized lab members?

Laboratory coats, gloves, and safety glasses must be available to all authorized lab members working with radioactive materials.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual.

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Are appropriate personnel supplied with dosimeters?

Personnel are required to wear dosimetry if they are likely to receive at least 10 percent of the annual federal government dose limits for radiation workers.  Depending on the source and amount of exposure, this may include whole body badges, rings, or both.  For more information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual, the UW Radioactive Materials License (License Number WN-C001-1), EH&S Homepage, and 246-221 WAC.

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Are dosimeters returned on time?

Personnel that wear dosimetry are required to return the dosimeters monthly or quarterly.  For more information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual, the UW Radioactive Materials License (License Number WN-C001-1), EH&S Homepage, and 246-221 WAC.

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Are the appropriate personnel completing the required bioassays?

Each person who works in a laboratory where more than 0.5 mCi of radioiodine (iodine-125 or iodine-131) is ordered or stored in a calendar quarter is required to complete an in vivo thyroid bioassay at the UW Radiation Safety Office.

Anyone working with more than 100 mCi of H-3 in a single use or anyone working with more than 100 mCi in a month must complete a bioassay.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual, the UW Radioactive Materials License (License Number WN-C001-1), EH&S Homepage, and 246-221 WAC.

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Are the bioassays completed on time?

Before working with radioiodine an in vivo thyroid bioassay baseline measurement is required. Routine in vivo thyroid bioassay measurements are required within 24-72 hours after work if the person uses more than 0.5 mCi of radioiodine per quarter or within 24-72 hours after work if the person uses more than 1.0 mCi of radioiodine on any single occasion.

Anyone working with more than 100 mCi of H-3 in a single use is required to complete a bioassay within one week of each use.  Anyone working with more than 100 mCi of H-3 in a month is required to complete a bioassay once a month.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual, the UW Radioactive Materials License (License Number WN-C001-1), and 246-221 WAC.

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Are meters appropriate for work done?

Each Principle Investigator is required to have the appropriate survey instruments capable of detecting the radioactive materials listed on their Radiation Use Authorization.  Radiation Safety staff will advise the Principle Investigator which survey instruments are required based on the radioactive materials used.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual.

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Are meters in good working order?

Survey instruments including portable meters, Liquid Scintillation Counters (LSCs), and other non-portable counting instruments are required to be in good working order and have a quality assurance test completed annually to assure the reliability and accuracy of the survey instrument.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radioactive Materials License (License Number WN-C001-1) and EH&S Homepage.

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Have meters been calibrated within the last 12 months?

Survey instruments are required to be calibrated annually.  Radiation Safety calibrates all portable meters as a commercial service according to in-house procedures derived from the manufacture’s procedures and specifications.  Liquid Scintillation Counters (LSCs) and other non-portable counting instruments used for contamination wipe surveys are required to be calibrated annually by the Principle Investigator to assure the reliability and accuracy of their instrument.  The Principle Investigator must document the annual calibrations and retain these records for five years.  For additional information please refer to the UW Radiation Safety Manual, EH&S Homepage, and the UW Radioactive Materials License (License Number WN-C001-1).

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Contact

Radiation Safety Contact

(206) 543-0463