Latest News

 

Report your metallic lead

Lead is a neurotoxin that accumulates in the body and damages the nervous system and causes blood disorders. Faculty, staff and students using metallic lead in a lab, shop or other workspace could be at risk for toxic lead exposure.

All quantities of metallic lead (e.g., metallic lead like bricks, buoy weights, window weights, lead sheeting, or solder) must be recorded in MyChem. MyChem is the UW’s chemical inventory management system and helps maintain our compliance with environmental and occupational health requirements.

 

Fall protection tips: Climbing the ladder to safety

Slips, trips, and falls are the second leading cause of injuries to UW employees, and there was an increase in reported incidents from 2016 to 2017. The University of Washington is committed to protecting employees and others from these hazards.

When you are working above 10 feet, using ladders, or walking on a loading dock, be sure to follow the required procedures and safety tips to stay safe.

Fall Protection Work Plan

 

Rabid bat found on campus

A bat found near Husky Stadium over the weekend was confirmed to have rabies, a central nervous system viral disease carried in the saliva of an infected animal that can be lethal if transmitted to humans. We are reminding students, staff and faculty to avoid coming into contact with bats, on campus or elsewhere, to avoid potential exposure to rabies.

 
 

Stay safe when using lithium batteries

Lithium batteries have become the industry standard rechargeable storage device. They are common to University operations and used in many research applications. Lithium-ion battery fires and accidents are on the rise; however, the risk can be mitigated.

EH&S recommends faculty, staff and students take precautions to help prevent fire, injury and loss of intellectual and other property. The following best practices may help reduce the possibility of a reaction, fire or explosion when handling, charging, storing or disposing of lithium-ion batteries:

 
 
 

It’s time to manage safety

Myth: “There isn’t enough time to manage employee safety.”

The reality is that the clock is ticking … your time is valuable and you’re on deadline, but you don’t have time to not manage safety in your lab. PIs and Lab Managers who avoid taking the time up-front to implement safe work practices often spend valuable time managing lab safety after an incident occurs.

When it comes to lab safety, you don’t have time to not mitigate hazards.

 

New Chemical Hygiene Officer Lab Safety Award

Lab Safety Award logo

Labs that receive a rating of 85 or higher on their most recent lab safety survey earn a Lab Safety Award. The Chemical Hygiene Officers (CHOs) are assigned by Principal Investigators to support lab safety programs, and are often responsible for much of the effort required to maintain a strong culture of safety. EH&S now acknowledges this effort with an award certificate.