Latest News

 
 

Find your safety training courses easily with a new tool

The General Health and Safety Course Selection Tool is a new comprehensive guide that will help supervisors and employees determine which health and safety courses to take. The guide is a task-based, accurate way to determine which courses are most relevant to address the hazards specific to an employee's individual work environment. After selecting the tasks specific to the employee, the tool will provide a list of required and recommended training courses that can be printed or emailed.

 

National Biosafety Month 2018: Promoting a culture of safety

During 2018's National Biosafety Month, you are encouraged to focus attention on biosafety policies and practices. Investigators and laboratory managers can raise biosafety awareness, discuss the importance of safety, and seek input on ways to strengthen biosafety in their labs. This year, EH&S is focusing on ways you can promote a culture of safety.

1. Know your responsibilities as a principal investigator (PI).

 
 

Download secondary chemical container labels

Many laboratories use hazardous chemicals that are purchased in large quantities and then transferred into smaller secondary containers (e.g., vials, flasks or bottles), or prepared as diluted solutions or mixtures for use.

If your laboratory uses secondary containers filled with chemicals, the secondary containers must comply with OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard for Labels and Pictograms.

 
 
 

Dry ice is common, yet hazardous

A Tacoma woman died from asphyxiation and her daughter-in-law is in critical condition after riding in a car with containers of dry ice. Even at normal room temperatures, dry ice will warm and release carbon dioxide gas, which can displace the oxygen inside a small, enclosed space. 

Dry ice is commonly used in UW research. Its properties allow for rapid cooling of materials, but also pose unique worker safety hazards.

 
 

Do not block campus fire lanes

When 9-1-1 is called on the UW Seattle campus, UW Police and Seattle Fire Department emergency vehicles will use designated fire lanes to get to the scene of the emergency quickly. It is critical that campus fire lanes are kept clear at all times to avoid emergency responders losing time getting to someone who needs help.