Radiation Producing Devices

All Radiation Producing Device (RPD) are regulated by the Washington State Department of Health and must be registered with the state prior to use. The University possesses one registration managed by EH&S’s Radiation Safety team. Depending on the type of device and its intended use, there are requirements for facility design, worker training and protection, and device operation.

A RPD is any piece of equipment that, when energized, is designed to emit ionizing radiation or could potentially emit ionizing radiation as a by-product of its operation. These types of devices pose a hazard if not used properly. Therefore, certain controls must be in place to ensure proper operation, employee safety and patient safety.

RPDs can be divided into two groups:

Medical – RPDs used on humans or animals. Examples include:

  • Particle accelerators
  • X-ray imaging devices

Research – RPDs not used on humans or animals. Examples include:

  • X-ray irradiator, diffraction, spectroscopy and fluorescence units
  • Electron microscopes
  • Particle accelerator

What you need to know

What you can do to stay safe

Services Available

EH&S provides the following services:

  • Lead apron testing
  • Device registration and evaluation
  • Safety training
  • Safety survey
  • Dosimetry (if needed)
  • Consultation

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

An individual is required to wear a dosimeter if Radiation Safety determines that the individual is likely to exceed 10 percent of a dose limit. Most RPDs do not require an individual to wear dosimetry during normal operations, but there are exceptions, particularly among medical use RPDs.

Additional information can be found on the Dosimetry page.

Lead PPE is not required for most research RPDs, but many medical use RPDs do require the use of lead PPE. Your supervisor should inform you if you need to wear lead during RPD operation. If you have any questions, please contact Radiation Safety for guidance.

More Information

Glossary

A piece of equipment that, when energized, is designed to emit ionizing radiation or could potentially emit ionizing radiation as a by-product of its operation.